Advertising


The advertising industry is regulated by the independent Advertising Standards Agency (ASA). However, in terms of sexist advertising the ASA has a poor track record of taking into account gender equality. Instead complaints relating to the sexualisation of women tend to be judged on the grounds of obscenity, decency and privacy (1).

If you have seen a sexist advert it is still important to object - as all objections must be logged and are valuable in terms of lobbying the ASA to change its practices.

OBJECT 
here to sexist broadcast and non-broadcast adverts.

READ THE OBJECT SPEECH AT THE 2012 PARLIAMENTARY DEBATE AGAINST THE ASA ON THE ISSUE OF 'SEXUALISED IMAGERY IN ADVERTISING' HERE

OBJECT met with Transport for London (TFL) in 2003, bringing to their attention the number of sexist adverts on the transport network. Since then TFL has dramatically altered its guidelines as to what material is appropriate. The codes are now excellent, although not always implemented. We continue to support the public in urging best practice on the transport network.

Have you seen a sexist advert? Take action today by downloading our
template letter (word doc) which includes a quick-step guide to complaining to TfL.


Anti-sexist advertising poster
Sexist ads - an 80's campaign poster

 (1) Amy-Chinn, D. (2006) This is just for Me(n): lingerie advertising for the post-feminist woman, Journal of Consumer Culture 6 (2) and Gill, R (2007) Gender and the Media. London, Polity Press.